History of Fiery Creek 3: The Rapture

The Rapture, for those less familiar with Christian eschatology, is the belief that, at one point in time, the dead believers will rise once again, Jesus will come a second time and all of the believers – zombies and non zombies – will meet the Lord in the air. Several authors have tried to predict a date for the Second Coming of Jesus and failed, except for one.

William Miller predicted that the second coming would happen between the 21st March 1843 and the same day of 1844. When nothing happened anywhere in the world, he assumed that he had made a mistake and recalculated the whole thing. Nobody at the time heard the news of a small town in the middle of the desert, Fiery Creek.

The 21st March 1843, the ground below Fiery Creek started to tremble. The earth cracked in several points, and strange noises came from the points in which the ground had fractured. The citizens gathered in the Caliph’s Palace, which was used as town hall at the time (this stopped being the case after Hell’s forces attacked the town for the last time in 1857).

Diane Vines, famous oracle of the town, who was a child of six at the time, spoke in the faerie palace, over everyone else’s voices. “It is the Second Coming” she said. “The dead are rising, and soon we shall all ascend into the air to meet the Lord”. Knowing her predictive powers – which mostly concerned fashion tips from the future and deaths -, the townsfolk decided to ignore her completely and demand reparations from the town hall.

At the time, most of the work in town hall was done by Mary Clark and Ba’al, prince of Hell. When they inspected the holes in the ground they found the dead of the first six Fiery Creek foundations, who were quite thirsty from the years spent buried. Once they helped them out, the zombies asked for directions to a bar, and they all went to the Fier family’s bar to get some drinks.

Of course, the living citizens complained. There was not enough housing for all of the new zombie settlers, and they should not be living in the streets. Mary Clark then had to devise a new district with new houses, which she built to the north of the town using ancient faerie magic. This was called the Revenant district, which stands today.

There was a time lapse of four months between the dead rising and the Second Coming. In those months, the neighbours of Fiery Creek had grown accustomed to the presence of the dead in town. They were friendly, didn’t use many resources and would contribute to the community as a literally tireless force.

In the hottest of July, a classic red mustang arrived in town, speeding through the desert and making the dust rise in clouds. Jesus – or, at least, someone everyone assumed was Jesus. He never gave a name – got off the car, sunglasses on, white linen shirt, long brown hair and a stubble in his face. “Sorry it took me four months to get here, got into a traffic jam. Let’s get this Rapture thing going, shall we?” he said.

He clapped and everyone started to float, even his mustang. Mary Clark, who had been working on resealing the last hole with a spade, hit the man hard in the head, and they all fell to the ground. “You think this is the right time for a Rapture?” she shouted at him. “It’s so hot, and you are going to have everyone travel through the air for hours? Think about the children and elderly! They might get dehydrated!”

The man apologized for his bad timing, recognizing that he had not taken all of those factors into account. Divine creatures do not undergo the same restraints as humans or other mortals, so he had not even considered that they might suffer in their trip up. He got onto his car once again, and said he would come back some other time, with a better plan.

The dust trail was lost into the desert. Nobody ever heard of him again.

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